Pinole Valley High School

October 27, 2016
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Earth Team intern, Brenda Moreida, removing the invasive plant species Cape Ivy.

Himalayan Blackberry, Cape Ivy, and English Ivy have proven to be tough contenders against Pinole Valley High interns. These three plant species are non-native and completely dominate areas of Pinole Creek banks. Native plants that help the ecosystem thrive are lacking in resources and space, due to these highly invasive non-native plants outcompeting...

October 27, 2016
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Earth Team intern, Brenda Moreida, removing the invasive plant species Cape Ivy.

Himalayan Blackberry, Cape Ivy, and English Ivy have proven to be tough contenders against Pinole Valley High interns. These three plant species are non-native and completely dominate areas of Pinole Creek banks. Native plants that help the ecosystem thrive are lacking in resources and space, due to these highly invasive non-native plants outcompeting...

October 26, 2016

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EarthTeam intern, Emily Banuelos,conducting WQ tests at Pinole Creek.

PVHS EarthTeam interns have began water quality monitoring of Pinole Creek! The site selected for bi-weekly WQ tests is directly behind the Pinole Library, and less than a mile upstream from the newly completed Fish Passage. The passage was implemented in order for endanger ed Steelhead, to effectively travel across the stretch of Pinole Creek below the I-80 Highway. These incredible species travel upstream from the Bay, to spawning grounds in fresh water. EarthTeam’s WQ monitoring will allow interns to determine if the...

October 10, 2016
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Pinole Valley High Interns at the Shoreline Festival at Pt. Pinole Regional Shoreline.

Pinole Valley High interns did an amazing job engaging members of the community about their local watershed through an interactive watershed matching activity game at the Shoreline Festival on October 1st. Community members were asked to match the correct habitat to the area drawn on a watershed map. The game...